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Newspaper Article - 7 August 1919 - on Asian immigration

  • CA SMA SMA-SR-2015-018
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Sidney and Islands Review, "The Review's Oriental Policy", 7 August 1919, Page 3.

"The Review's Oriental Policy
The attitude of The Review on the Oriental question should by this time be well known. We have on several occasions published editorials expressing our conviction that British Columbia would be better off without Japanese, Chinese and Hindus. We believe industrial, civic and educational conditions would be improved, and that prohibition of Oriental immigration and ownership would do much for the development of the Province.
But it must be borne in mind that the present beads of industries are not entirely to blame for present conditions, some of them not to blame at all. Oriental labor was imported by the big interests, whose only motive was to cheapen production. After the Chinese, Japs and Hindus were here they were confronted with the necessity of making a living, and they entered into competition with white men in the logging camps, in the mills, the fisheries and wherever they could find employment. They worked for lower wages, and without realizing the far-reaching deleterious results of the advent of Asiatic labor to the local market, the industries hired them.
The problem which now confronts many of the captains of industry is how to get rid of the Oriental and still continue to operate industry at a profit. For one mill or one cannery to employ whites to the exclusion of Orientals while other plants in the same line of business continue to use Oriental labor at reduced wages, means that the institution using only white labor must cease to complete. It is patent that for any single plant among the industries employing Orientals to shift at once to white labor at a wage increase of say 40 per cent, would mean financial disaster for that plant. Unless in place of the discharged Oriental hands the newly employed white hands gave it a very material increase in quantity of production. We hear a great deal said about how much more the white man can do than the Oriental, and while we fully believe that the white man is incomparably more intelligent, more energetic and more efficient, we beg to point out that tabulated comparative results along this line are practically non-existent, and that the average employer making a change from Oriental to white labor would be working largely in the dark.
Clearly, for one captain of industry to oust the Oriental without his associates doing the same could have but the result of putting that man's industry out of business. The Asiatic cannot be gotten rid of without concerted action; and concerted action is an impossibility without unamimity of opinion. It would appear that the problem is not one for the captains of industry but for the people to solve. Orientals were permitted to be imported to the Province because there were no prohibitive statutes on the civil code. The people have the power, through intelligent use of the plebiscite, to provide for the enactment of such laws as are needed, and not only to prohibit Oriental immigration, but to eject Orientals already here. The solution of the problem lies not in howling about the employers and the newspapers which are supposed to side with them, but in intelligent and unanimous action at the polls. When Oriental labor is excluded by law the problem will be solved, but not before. When conditions are such that employment of white lobor exclusively does not work a hardship upon industry, white labor will be exclusively employed. It is up to the people."

Newspaper Article - 25 September 1919 - on the 'Oriental Menace'

  • CA SMA SMA-SR-2015-019
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Sidney and Islands Review, "The Oriental Menace", 25 September 1919, Page 4.

"The Oriental Menace"
The Oriental, the Chinese, the Japanese and the Hindus, are taking a most important place in the development of British Columbia, which, if continued, our Province will soon cease to be a white man's land. It will be a case of the Oriental to the right of him, to the left of him and all around him. The Chinese spend no money in this country, or most of what they do spend goes through Chinese channels, so that the white race gets little or no benefit. Do they live under sanitary conditions? No, they hive. Are there laws on the statue books regulating these conditions? Yes. Are they enforced? No. Why? Because of the apathy of the Government. Are they alone to blame? No. Why? The people are to blame for not insisting on the Government having the laws enforced. The Chinaman is gradually moving up town from the Chinese quarters in Vancouver and Victoria, displacing the white man. Do the Chinese take any stock in our anti-gambling or the opium laws. No, the disregard them entirely and are rarely caught and punished for infractions. Are the powers aware of these facts? Surely they must be. What steps do they take to have the laws enforced? Practically none. Why? General Apathy is again in command. Can the Chinese assimilate with the white race? No. Then if they won't or can't be made to live like white men in a sanitary fashion, and if they disregard the laws of the Province, and if they can't be assimilated, why are they here. Are they required in British Columbia? No. Are they a "cheap" labor? Yes. Does the minimum way laws apply to them? No. Why not? Apathy once more. Will the Government get busy and make the minimum way act apply to them? Yes. Why? When the people rise up in their might and swat them. Not before. Are the Chinese a benefit to British Columbia? In some channels, yes. In the mines, mills and as domestic and on farms are they a necessity? No. Prince Edward Island produces 85 per cent of its consumption without chinks and if British Columbia makes an effort she would probably do nearly as well. Are the Chinese likeable and sociable? The bulk, no, being morose, pig-headed and sulky. Some of them, a very small percentage of them, are sports in their own way and are liked by their white neighbors, but not many.
Do the Chinese come to this county to stay? No, only till such time as they amass enough wealth to live comfortably, if not luxuriously, in China till the end of their days. Did the Chinese workman prove to be more loyal to his employer during the past few years when labor was scarce? Certainly not. They held him up at every turn, worked no harder, and killed as much time as usual if not more. Are they wanted in British Columbia? No, except by a small minority for selfish purposes. What is the best method of solving the problem? Force them to live in sanitary houses; stop them hiving. Give stiff jail terms or deport law-breakers. Let them see that we mean business and that they must live like white men in a white man's country, and they will either do so or go back to China. Apply the minimum wage act to them and they will cease to be so "popular" with employer. Will we nail up the coffin of the Chinese question? The people have the hammer in their hands. Then let us all hit the nail on the head with swift, sure and strong strokes.
In a future issue we will take up the question regarding other Oriental races.

Red Robe

  • CA SMA SMA_015.015.001
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Black Robe

  • CA SMA SMA_015.015.002
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Basket

  • CA SMA SMA_971.003.180
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Chinese basket, made of bamboo with rectangular base and rounded (almost a circle) top. Open, has two handles. Base and 'ribs' of basket made of thicker bamboo, woven body of basket of bamboo and cane. Top rim wrapped with border approx. 3.5cm.

Basket

  • CA SMA SMA_971.003.181
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Chinese basket, made of bamboo with rectangular base and rounded (almost a circle) top. Open, has two handles. Base and 'ribs' of basket made of thicker bamboo, woven body of basket of bamboo and cane. Top rim wrapped with border approx. 3 cm. deep. Oriental characters in black painted/applied to inside of basket.

Basket

  • CA SMA SMA_971.008.209
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Cylindrical basket of wicker with wooden circular base (attached to wicker with small metal nails). Recorded information: "Basket, Wicker, Chinese." Width of basket increases with height. Base area (approx 2/3-3/4 of height is woven wicker), top has a flat band of wicker like material around the cane structure and this is held in place by a narrow flat band of braided material similar to wicker. This braid is laced across the top area and is wound around the wicker ribs of the basket. In several places this braid is attached to the wicker ribs with nails.

Pot

  • CA SMA SMA_971.J.037
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Stone ware pottery jug - squat shape, glazed dark brown outside. Has mouth that will take a cork stopper and a small spout to pour with. Described as "soya sauce pot" & illustrated pgs. 99-100 Vol. 2. Western Canadian Bottle Collecting. Diameter of mouth rim 0.045m, diameter of base 0.125m.

Bottle

  • CA SMA SMA_971.J.038
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Wine bottle, Chinese pottery.

Teapot

  • CA SMA SMA_971.J.039
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Chinese porcelain.

Box

  • CA SMA SMA_971.J.041
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Chinese, lacquered, used to hold trinkets.

Bowl

  • CA SMA SMA_971.J.043
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Large wooden bowl made from one solid piece of wood - wood unknown, very dark inside, posssibly stained or darkened by use. Probably hand turned. Slightly oval in shape. Recorded as "used for bean sprouting by Chinese". Diameter approx. - 0.56m at top rim.

Dish

  • CA SMA SMA_971.J.044
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Dish, small, porcelain, blue and white. Chinese sauce dish. Very old.

Bowl

  • CA SMA SMA_971.J.047
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Made of Chinese porcelain; part of a child's tea set made in 1910.

Basket

  • CA SMA SMA_972.028.402 a
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Basket, oriental design, made of bamboo with fine basket work on body and sides. Base and ribs made of heavier bamboo. Base is rectangular with sides that flare outward and a top which is rounded. Base is in "Basket weave". Top rim has two handles attached on parallel sides, rim is wrapped with cane/bamboo in a lighter color and has five rows of reinforced caning which forms a boarder.

Basket

  • CA SMA SMA_972.028.402 b
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Oriental basket of similar design to "A" has rectangular base, sides which flare out and two handles on parallel sides.

Basket

  • CA SMA SMA_972.028.402 c
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Basket, probably oriental design with rectangular base, flared sides and almost circular top. Woven of very fine bamboo or cane, wrapped top edge in a material of a lighter color.

Basket

  • CA SMA SMA_972.028.494
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Chinese basket with rectangular base, sides flare outward to an almost circular top. Top is open. Bamboo construction with base and ribs of thicker bamboo. Top rim is reinforced with four rows of thicker bamboo, body of basket is woven or narrow bamboo or cane.

Basket and Lid

  • CA SMA SMA_972.028.499 a-b
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Circular basket with lid used for sewing materials. Made of fine material, possibly bamboo? Has been stained a brownish red color. Lid is decorated with a thin braided cord of golden brown color. Circular metal medallion with Chinese characters is attached to the basket lid with a braid that has been knotted in an intricate design and has a pink glass bead attached to it. Lid is slightly indented in the center.

Fan

  • CA SMA SMA_972.047.924
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Ladies fan, with ivory frame. Either end has floral carving on it with painted gold detail, as do the base areas of the individual ivory fan 'ribs'. The fabric on the upper part of the fan 'ribs' has cream coloured fabric covering, probably silk. which is decorated with gold and silver coloured sequins.

Bottle

  • CA SMA SMA_972.055.821
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Small old Chinese medicine bottle.

Carrying Pole

  • CA SMA SMA_972.069.900
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Wooden Chinese carrying pole with metal strips each side (nailed in) to hold straps in place. Slightly shaped. Long thin slightly flattened pole with flatter ends. About 8" from end of poles there are (at each end) two leather strips about one inch apart and about 1/2" wide by 1 1/2" long. these leather strips are used to hold baskets from sliding off the ends of the poles. Wood is unknown, a brownish red colour and seems to have been oiled or stained.

Scratcher

  • CA SMA SMA_972.J.495
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Wooden dowel of unknown wood-probably hardwood with a diamond shaped end and carved hand. Hand shape is hand carved from bone or ivory. Recorded as a "Chinese, bone".

Bottle

  • CA SMA SMA_972.J.528
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Transparent, deep green, glass bottle, circular base. No seams visible. Possibly contained wine. Mouth will take a cork stopper. Recorded as possibly Chinese.

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